Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

For those who have carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it’s no surprise that CTS is frequently most expressive during the night, often to the point of interrupting sleep and/or making it difficult to fall back to sleep. So why is that?

The primary reason for nighttime CTS symptoms has to do with the wrist, as it is very difficult to sleep with the wrist held in its “ideal” or least irritating position. In fact, most people favor “curling” the back of the hand under the chin or bending the hand/wrist backwards under the head. When the wrist is bent in either direction, it can increase the pressure inside the wrist, which can generate the various symptoms associated with CTS.

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When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) affects 3% of the adults in the United States and is the most common of the “entrapment neuropathies” (pinched nerves in the arms or legs). Treatment for CTS is frequently delayed because the symptoms are usually mild at first and progress gradually. Because CTS symptoms may be more advanced by the time a patient seeks treatment, he or she may think surgery is the only viable option. So, when should a patient consider surgery for CTS?

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Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-surgical treatment approaches for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) aim to remove pressure on the median nerve where it’s pinched. In a recent review of the literature published on “passive modalities” (non-surgical treatment approaches) for CTS, researchers reviewed studies published between 1990 and 2015 for information on which non-surgical treatment approaches work best. Topping the list is the use of various types of night splints – wrist braces worn at night to prevent bending of the wrist during sleep. The evidence found that night splints were less effective than surgery in the short-term (up to six months) but more effective over the long-term (at 12 and 18 months)!

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Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non surgical treatment approaches for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) aim to remove pressure on the median nerve where it’s pinched. In a recent review of the literature published on “passive modalities” (non-surgical treatment approaches) for CTS, researchers reviewed studies published between 1990 and 2015 for information on which non-surgical treatment approaches work best. Topping the list is the use of various types of night splints – wrist braces worn at night to prevent bending of the wrist during sleep. The evidence found that night splints were less effective than surgery in the short-term (up to six months) but more effective over the long-term (at 12 and 18 months)!

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