How a Change in Diet Can Help Vineland Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Sufferers

How a Change in Diet Can Help Vineland Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Sufferers

We have seen a lot of carpal tunnel syndrome patients over the years, some suffer it off and on, while others seem to have it more consistently. While we can treat it and also suggest some exercises for you, another area you can look at is your diet. A special carpal tunnel syndrome diet in Vineland can actually help reduce pain and inflammation running across the median nerve could be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (cts). By incorporating these inflammation reducing foods into your diet, your pain from cts may improve.

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7 Possible Causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

7 Possible Causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

7 Possible Causes of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a condition caused by compression of the median nerve

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a condition caused by compression of the median nerve as it travels through the carpal tunnel at the wrist, possibly resulting in numbness, tingling, and eventually weakness in the thumb and the index, middle, and ring fingers. “True” CTS occurs when the median nerve is pinched while it travels through the carpal tunnel; however, other conditions can mimic and/or contribute to CTS. Let’s take a look at seven possible causes of CTS…

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Can it Be Prevented?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Can it Be Prevented?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a VERY common condition where the median nerve is compressed or squeezed as it passes through the wrist. One reason that it’s so common is because MANY daily activities require fast, repetitive use of the fingers, hands, and arms, and the friction of the rapidly moving muscle tendons inside the tunnel results in swelling and compression of the nerve. So, can CTS really be prevented?

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – Why Is It So Bad at Night?

For those who have carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), it’s no surprise that CTS is frequently most expressive during the night, often to the point of interrupting sleep and/or making it difficult to fall back to sleep. So why is that?

The primary reason for nighttime CTS symptoms has to do with the wrist, as it is very difficult to sleep with the wrist held in its “ideal” or least irritating position. In fact, most people favor “curling” the back of the hand under the chin or bending the hand/wrist backwards under the head. When the wrist is bent in either direction, it can increase the pressure inside the wrist, which can generate the various symptoms associated with CTS.

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When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

When Should I Consider Surgery for CTS?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) affects 3% of the adults in the United States and is the most common of the “entrapment neuropathies” (pinched nerves in the arms or legs). Treatment for CTS is frequently delayed because the symptoms are usually mild at first and progress gradually. Because CTS symptoms may be more advanced by the time a patient seeks treatment, he or she may think surgery is the only viable option. So, when should a patient consider surgery for CTS?

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Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-Surgical Treatment Approaches for CTS

Non-surgical treatment approaches for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) aim to remove pressure on the median nerve where it’s pinched. In a recent review of the literature published on “passive modalities” (non-surgical treatment approaches) for CTS, researchers reviewed studies published between 1990 and 2015 for information on which non-surgical treatment approaches work best. Topping the list is the use of various types of night splints – wrist braces worn at night to prevent bending of the wrist during sleep. The evidence found that night splints were less effective than surgery in the short-term (up to six months) but more effective over the long-term (at 12 and 18 months)!

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